Coin Collecting Silver Dollars

Coin Collecting Silver Dollars
Coin Collecting Silver Dollars

Of the silver dollars produced, which include the Peace dollar and the seated liberty dollar, the most popular was and still is the Morgan silver dollar. Although it is still considered to be legal tender today, no one would be so foolish as to spend one when it only carries a face value of $1.00.

Coin Collecting Silver Dollars

The Morgan silver dollar has suffered major losses in inventory since its beginning. Thanks to the Pittman Act of 1918, over 270 million silver dollars were melted down. Following this, there were other smaller meltings. Morgan dollars continue to suffer this same fate even today. Every time the cost of silver rises, more of them are melted by private individuals. The value of their silver content far outweighs their face value and, in many cases, their intrinsic value as collector items. It is believed that today only 17% of all the Morgan dollars ever produced still exist.

Coin Collecting Silver Dollars

On all coins, the front is called the obverse and the back is called the reverse. The mint marks on Morgan silver dollars are found on the obverse right between the D and O within the word dollar. Usually the Morgans that were made at the Philadelphia mint were unmarked so Philadelphia should be assumed when no mint mark is found.

Coin Collecting Silver Dollars

A silver dollar is basically a coin that is valued at exactly one dollar in America. These "dollar" coins were minted way back in 1794. If you owe to have a silver dollar you are really lucky indeed because these are one of the rarest coins found in present day. They were either minted in your regular base metals or even with finer resources such as gold or silver. This coin is viewed by the public in a manner of great care and most do not want to simply give their coin away or sell it, especially collectors. Most of them have been thought of as a coin that was minted on mistake. Even though these were produced during 1804, they were minted with the date of 1803. Any coin which is lighter colored, often "white" is always known as a silver dollar in the USA.

Coin Collecting Silver Dollars

There are numerous different types of commemorative Canadian silver dollars and bullion coins that were released, such as the following:
  • The 1939 Royal Visit by Emanuel Hahn
  • The 1949 Newfoundland Entry Into Confederation by Thomas Shingles
  • The 1958 Cariboo Gold Rush by Stephen Trenka
  • The 1964 Confederations Meetings by Dinko Vodanovic
  • The 1967 Canadian Centennial by Alex Coville and Myron Cook
  • The 1973 Royal Canadian Mint Press Centennial by Paul Cedarberg
  • The 1974 Winnipeg Centennial by Paul Pederson

Coin Collecting Silver Dollars

Coin Collecting Silver Dollars

Coin Collecting Silver Dollars
Coin Collecting Silver Dollars

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